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Antithrombin III

Definition

Antithrombin III is a blood test that measures the amount of antithrombin III (AT III), a protein that helps control blood clotting.

Alternative Names

AT III

How the test is performed

A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

How to prepare for the test

Certain medicines may affect the results of the test. Your health care provider may tell you to stop taking certain medicines or reduce their dose before the test. Do not stop taking any medicine before speaking with your doctor.

How the test will feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain, while others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing.

Why the test is performed

Your doctor may order this test if you have repeated blood clots or if blood thinning medicine does not work.

Normal Values

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What abnormal results mean

Lower-than-normal AT III may mean you have an increased risk of clotting. This can occur when there is not enough AT III in your blood, or when there is enough AT III in your blood, but the AT III doesn't work right and less active.

Abnormal results may not show up until you are an adult.

Examples of complications associated with increased blood clotting are:

Lower than normal AT III may be due to:

Higher than normal AT III may be due to:

  • Use of anabolic steroids

What the risks are

Veins and arteries vary in size from one patient to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

Other risks may include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling light-headed
  • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)

Special considerations

Birth control pills can cause a slight decrease in AT III levels.

References

Schafer AI. Thrombotic disorders: hypercoagulable states. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 179.


Review Date: 6/5/2012
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.
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